10+ Oddities Whose Purpose Had Us Scratching Our Heads

10+ Oddities Whose Purpose Had Us Scratching Our Heads

If you’ve ever stumbled upon an object that left you scratching your head, wondering what it could be — you’re not alone. In fact, there are many items out there that have puzzled people for years. Sometimes, all it takes is a fresh pair of eyes to decipher the mystery.

This article has compiled a list of unusual things — from ancient artifacts to modern-day oddities. These objects have been the subject of much speculation and debate. Thanks to the expertise of professionals in various fields, their true purpose has finally been revealed.

“This was left at my work in what we call ’lighting world’, where the lights are made pretty at concerts. No one knows what it is.”

Answer: “It’s a fake camel toe. Usually for drag queens, trans women etc.”

“What is this rectangle filled with orange jelly goo with an oval metal thing floating in it?”

Answer: It’s a hand warmer. Flex the disc to activate it. Once it’s been used, you can boil it back to a liquid to re-use it.”

“What is this object I found on a beach that has holes in and feels like a mix between stone and plastic?”

Answer: “This is an antique toothbrush from the Victorian era. The handle is crafted from animal bone, and the holes in the brush head are where the bristles would be inserted. Toothbrushes with bristles like this were first invented in the 1400s. However, it wasn’t until the late 1700s and early 1800s that toothbrushes became popular in Europe.”

“Can you help me identify this mystery item found in my pub?”

Answer: “It’s a sailmaker’s palm, used by sailors sewing sails together and needing to push the needle through the thick fabric.”

“What are these smaller doors inside our hotel bathroom door?”

Answer: “Some of our friends in the French countryside have children and pets but no air conditioning. To keep their kids and pets out of or in specific rooms while still being able to hear them, communicate with them, and keep an eye on them, they use ‘Dutch’ doors. These doors are divided horizontally into two parts that can be opened separately, allowing for ventilation while keeping children and pets safe and secure in designated areas.”

“Strange capsules found in a ski area in the Alps, what are these?”

Answer: “These pods are designed to mitigate avalanches. They use a combination of gas and noise to dislodge snow from the mountain, preventing it from accumulating and causing avalanches.”

“4 inches, plastic, pointed on one side. Received as a Xmas gift. What is it?”

Answer: “This is a page spreader for reading. It’s designed to help you keep a book open with one hand while you read. The spreader’s pointed end goes into the book’s spine, and your thumb goes into the hole.”

“Found an old, finger-sized object in an old house, any ideas what it is? Looks kind of like a small shovel.”

Answer: “It’s the striker from a garden-themed wind chime that uses a miniature watering can as the suspension point for the chimes. I have one, here’s the pic:”

“Asked my 78-year-old great-grandmother what this was, she said, ’Oh, your aunt left that.’ What is this?”

Answer: “It’s actually a pool toy.”

“Bought a jean jacket, then felt a ball sewn into the lining; found this lightweight, velvety softball that I couldn’t crush in my hand. What IS that?”

Answer: “These fabric sponge balls have a coating to help them slide and grip fabric. They are designed to fit into a tool on the sewing machine table that pushes out corners and shapes when turning the garment right side out. The balls are firm but soft enough not to damage the fabric. However, they can come off easily if pulled too hard.”

“What is this black rubber thing attached to a bungee-type cord inside my new ski jacket?”

Answer: “It’s a phone holder.”

“Fully wooden, too short to be a table, too wide to be a bench. Found at a farmers market, what could this thing be?”

Answer: “It’s an Indian elephant seat, also known as howdah, usually placed on top of an elephant to sit on. Howdahs have been used in India for centuries and were often used by royalty and other important people for transportation. They are typically made of wood and are decorated with intricate carvings and designs.”

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